Zoe and I spent yesterday scheming about blanket fort and ice creaming, but what really saved the week for us both was pulling out the camera and my ridiculously oversized flash umbrella.

Curious

This is the first real photoshoot I’ve done - which sounds ridiculous! I’ve tended to take photos of the things I’m doing, rather than set out to deliberately create art. That’s something I’d like to move more into, and modelling/portrait photography is one way I’d like to do that.

Smirk

Zoe did a bunch of modelling early last year, so she provided most of the direction. I’d had no real concept of how hard it is to figure out an ideal pose, communicate that, and then actually pose for it! Every step is insane.

Smile

I found this shirt in Vegas and I probably should have bought 7 so it could become my new uniform. Zoe pointing out that the look I was channeling was 100% Taylor in 22 (#LifeGoals) made it clear what kind of shots we were after.

Attitude

Lessons Learned

  • The importance of creating atmosphere: Playing 22 in the background whilst shooting made it easy to feel the vibe we were going for.
  • Have a few different ideas: I’m incredibly bad at keeping my expressions natural, they start to look forced very quickly. Having a few different ideas means you have a range of ideal things to switch between, instead of just sort of making it up.
  • Iterating is super useful: We focussed on a different aspect every time we paused to review, so that we eventually had a list of steps to execute.
  • Bad photos aren’t something to be ashamed of: I mean, you should have your technical skills down, but it’s totally okay for it to take a while to narrow down what ‘success’ means in this context.
  • Aspect Ratio is the most fun: Switching from 4:6 to 1:1 is pretty common nowadays (thanks to polaroids and insta), but I love seeing how the feel of a photo changes with the small shifts from e.g. 4x6 to 4x5.
  • We really need a bigger backdrop: Photoshopping out doors is way too much effort!